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Acer Aspire 4339 Battery all-laptopbattery.com

Putting your laptop through an occasional full charge cycle can help calibrate the battery on many laptops. This ensures the laptop knows exactly how much charge it has left and can show you an accurate estimate. In other words, if your battery isn’t calibrated properly, Windows may think you have 20% battery left when it’s really 0%, and your laptop will shut down without giving you much warning.By allowing the laptop’s battery to (almost) fully discharge and then recharge, the battery circuitry can learn how much power it has left. This isn’t necessary on all devices. In fact, Apple explicitly says it’s no longer necessary for modern MacBooks with built-in batteries.This calibration process won’t improve the battery’s lifespan or make it hold more energy—it will only ensure the computer is giving you an accurate estimation. But this is one reason you wouldn’t to leave your laptop plugged in all the time. When you unplug it and use it on battery power, it might show you incorrect battery life estimates and die before you expect it to.

Your laptop’s battery isn’t going to last forever, and it will gradually have less capacity over time no matter what you do. All you can do is hope your laptop’s battery lasts until you can replace your laptop with a new one.Of course, even if the capacity of your laptop’s battery declines, you’ll still be able to keep using it while plugged into a power outlet anyway.Ever since smartphones ate the world whole, tapping and touching screens has become an expectation in new gear you buy. But tap the screen on any given laptop in your local electronics superstore, and it’s a roll of the dice whether you’ll get a response, or just an oily fingerprint.Touch screens are a staple of modern computing, but not every laptop has one. It’s a feature that you need to shop for specifically. With some categories of laptop, it’s uncertain whether the machine will support touch. With others, their very nature is a virtual guarantee that they will—or won’t. The key is knowing the difference.

At PCMag, we test hundreds of computers a year, some with touch screens, many without. Based on our in-labs testing and deep-dive reviews, we compiled the above matrix of the best touch-equipped machines that have passed through our hands. Below, let’s run through the basics of laptop touch screens and why you might (or might not) want one.First of all, some terminology. In most cases, a touch-screen-equipped laptop has a conductive digitizing layer, overlaid on the panel element, that allows for tap, pinch, or swipe input. Most modern laptops make use of what’s known as capacitive touch input, in which the over-screen layer detects where you’ve touched with one or more fingers using the conductivity of your skin. This layer is typically a grid of ultra-fine wires, or a film; it needs to be subtle or translucent enough to not interfere with viewability.

That electrical aspect explains why touch screens don’t work if you’re wearing gloves. This is in contrast to the resistive touch technology you might see in other implementations of touch screens, in which the upper layer covering the screen flexes. When you write or tap on a resistive screen, that upper layer closes a circuit with another layer beneath it. (Having to press a little to, say, sign your name on a screen is an earmark of resistive touch.)Back to capacitive, though. The capacitive touch layer maps your finger or pen input to coordinates on the screen that determine the position of your touch. Also detected are parameters such as tap speed, whether you’ve tapped versus swiped, or if you’ve executed multi-finger touch. Note that tap pressure sensitivity is not a parameter that is typically detected through simple finger touch, though certain touch implementations and stylus pens might transmit that. More on those later.

A few panels use an infrared X/Y axis-mapping technology, in which sensors in the bezel cross-reference an interruption of their beams at a specific intersecting screen location, but the employment of this tech in laptops is rare. It’s usually seen only in cases where the panel is very large, or uses a display technology that is not available in a variant that can accept capacitive touch (or is cost-prohibitive).Note that the screens in a given laptop family may come with options for touch and non-touch versions. This is the case with some mainstream and business-oriented clamshell laptops, especially ones in model lines that sell in lots of subtly different retail configurations, or that have many tweakable configuration options when sold direct. When looking at one of these machines, be very much cognizant whether or not the particular screen or screen option you are looking at supports touch.

For example, a laptop might come in a version with a 1,366-by-768-pixel screen without touch support, as well as in another with an upticked 1,920-by-1,080-pixel (1080p) panel that does do touch. Or, more confusingly, the manufacturer might offer both touch and non-touch options at 1080p. Attention to detail matters here.Depending on the specific kind of laptop you’re looking at, the tendency toward touch support will vary. Let’s dig into the major types.Budget clamshells. Most low-cost machines that are straight-up laptops (that is, models that do not have 2-in-1-type hinges or tablet modes) will not have touch screens, but you’ll run across the occasional exception. In under-$500 machines, a touch screen should be seen as a pleasant surprise, not a given. Exception: 2-in-1s, more about which in a moment.

Mainstream and business clamshells. You’ll see the most varied mix of touch and non-touch models here. This is the category most likely to be frought with touch versus non-touch models in the same system family. Take for example, the 1080p non-touch panel versus the 4K touch panel in the latest Dell XPS 13.2-in-1 convertibles and detachables. By their very nature, all 2-in-1 machines will have touch screens. When you’re using a 360-degree-rotating 2-in-1 in tent or tablet mode, you don’t have access to the keyboard, so touch input is essential in those modes. Likewise in a detachable 2-in-1: Remove the keyboard, and all you’re left with for input is your tapping fingers or a stylus, Indeed, a key differentiator here is whether the 2-in-1 additionally supports stylus input, and if so, whether the stylus is included or costs extra. A high-profile example of the latter: the Microsoft Surface devices, which mandate $99 for the complement Surface Pen stylus.

Gaming laptops. Most gaming laptops have 15- or 17-inch screens, and very few offer touch input. PC gamers don’t have much use for touch input (PC games aren’t written to support it), and implementing a touch screen would reduce what is already an often already challenged battery.Giant-screen machines. It’s rare to see a laptop of any stripe with a 17-inch display that supports touch input. Touch-panel implementations at that size are pricey and simply not cost-effective. Razer’s Blade Pro is an uncommon exception, and the touch screen is available only as an option.Chromebooks. Touch screens did not feature in early chromebook models, but we’re seeing them in more and more new ones. With the emergence of 2-in-1 convertible chromebooks (most are 360-degree-rotating designs), touch is becoming more common in this class, especially as support for Android apps profilerates on these machines. The Chrome OS operating system itself is not optimized or intended for touch.

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