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Battery for Acer TravelMate 5744

Skateboarder almost caught your heels? Cyclist overshooting the white line by a metre? Someone looking too intently at their smartphone to walk in a straight line? Take that! And that! Don’t mess with me, I’ll blow you away!Come the great legal revolution, my firing range will also be lined up with auto checkouts from supermarkets, cash machines that keep showing me ads, gas engineers who hand me leaflets about Hive, and everyone everywhere even remotely involved with the Internet of Things. Intrusive, every single one.Google is apparently going to fold Chrome OS into Android, potentially killing the development of a secure, lightweight desktop OS in the process.The Wall Street Journal, citing anonymous sources, claims engineers at the Mountain View giant have spent the past two years merging Chrome OS into Android.The end result will be an all-encompassing OS for mobile devices and notebooks, we’re told. The software will be demonstrated by the end of 2016, and released the next year, the WSJ claims.Chrome OS was pitched as an operating system for low-powered netbooks, and is largely aimed at the education market. It is built from the open-source Chromium OS, a minimal Gentoo-derived GNU/Linux operating system that pretty much does everything through the Chrome (or Chromium) web browser.

Although it can run a handful of native apps offline, it’s mostly a terminal to the web: word processing, games, social nattering, and so on, can all be done online through the browser.The integration of Chrome OS into Android is not unexpected: a merging of the two operating systems has been on the cards since 2013, when Google Android exec Andy Rubin was replaced by Chrome OS veteran Sundar Pichai. A year later, Google showed off technology allowing Android apps to run on Chrome OS systems, and today Pichai is Google’s chief exec.The reported move is not without its critics, particularly in the security community. While Chrome OS is praised for its minimal attack surface and locked-down sandboxed browser environment, Android has been riddled with vulnerabilities. If development of Chrome OS stalls while Googlers focus on building a laptop-friendly Android, that’s what you might call bad news.Microsoft released build 10572 of Windows 10 Mobile last week, hot on the heels of build 10549, as the release date nears for the first Windows 10 smartphones, the Lumia 950 and 950XL, expected in November.

The company has not made it easy for Windows Insiders keeping up with the builds. Both 10549 and 10572 require first resetting your phone back to Windows Phone 8.1, which means double the effort.The Windows Phone story is heartbreaking for its fans, with Microsoft first acquiring Nokia, the main device vendor, and then dismantling most of it, declaring a change of strategy. What the new strategy is has never been clearly articulated, but it seems to involve a retreat from the mainstream smartphone market. Microsoft phones will instead be ultra-portable PCs, aimed at business and productivity users, with the ability to connect to full-size displays, keyboard and mouse.This feature, called Continuum, requires new hardware, even though Windows 10 Mobile will install on most existing Windows 8.1 devices. The reason seems to be lack of dual-display capability in existing hardware.Existing devices, like the Lumia 830 on which this review is being typed, can connect wirelessly to full-size displays, but only with display mirroring, limiting the screen resolution. True Continuum displays different content on each screen. Therefore the forthcoming HD-500 Display Dock requires a Lumia 950 or 950XL.Despite this limitation, there are features in this build that seem to be aimed at Continuum users. After connecting to an external display, there is an Advanced setting appears that only offers “Mirror what’s on my device”, but which would presumably have further options on new hardware.

You can also reduce the size of the text and other on-screen items, making it almost unreadable on the phone itself, but more usable on the connected display. This makes it feasible to type a document in Word Mobile, though I cannot pretend it is a great experience. Connecting a Bluetooth mouse is no-go for me; the mouse works, but types random repeating characters as a side-effect. Without a mouse, it is fiddly to perform operations like taking a screenshot, inserting it into the document, and cropping it. I found myself looking forward to finishing the document on a real PC.Another issue is power management. In full Windows 10, you can vary how quickly the screen goes off after inactivity, according to whether the device is on battery or external power. This is not possible in the current build, and screen time-outs are particularly annoying since the wireless display disconnects.Continuum lets you connect to an external display with dual screens
Continuum lets you connect to an external display with dual screens
Real Continuum will be a better experience, though no doubt there will still be annoyances. The open question here is how useful it will be. It only makes sense if you are travelling without a laptop or tablet, and to use it you will need keyboard, mouse and a display with either the Microsoft dock or wireless connectivity. It is unlikely to replace a PC since x86 applications will not run. It all sounds rather niche.How is Windows 10 Mobile shaping up as a smartphone OS? It is usable though there is still occasional jerkiness on the Lumia 830 used for this review. There are several things to like. App navigation is excellent, with the Start menu available by swiping in from the right, and pinned tiles which support groups as well as multiple sizes. Cortana, Microsoft’s digital assistant, makes more sense on a phone than on a PC, and works rather well, with decent voice recognition as well as handy features like reading incoming texts and accepting dictated replies, now fixed to be always on (as an option) rather than restricted to Bluetoooth audio. Give Cortana a sum to do, and a calculator appears embedded in the reply, another neat feature.

Police have seized the laptop of a BBC journalist who had interviewed men identifying themselves with jihadist organisation Islamic State in order to access these communications.The laptop of Secunder Kermani was taken by police under powers available through the Terrorism Act 2000, according to the Independent.The Register understands Kermani has not been detained or questioned.Kermani, a journalist with BBC’s flagship current affairs programme Newsnight, had produced interviews and features on British-born terrorists and others from Western backgrounds sympathetic to jihadist organisation Islamic State.While the seizure was ostensibly to acquire the journalist’s communications with one such source, it is notable because it forced Kermani to hand over his personal property, rather than a standard request to an internet service provider to collect retained communications data.According to a BBC spokesperson: Police obtained an order under the Terrorism Act requiring the BBC to hand over communication between a Newsnight journalist and a man in Syria who had publicly identified himself as an IS member. The man had featured in Newsnight reports and was not a confidential source.While controversy persists regarding police powers under RIPA (Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act) to target the communications of journalists, previous complaints triggered reforms that now require the police to obtain a court-issued warrant before targeting journalists’ communications. However, the Interception of Communication Commissioner’s Office (IOCCO) reported this year that many police forces were failing to do so.

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